Smart Live-Work Spaces

written by:
October 30, 2013
Our current model of efficiency is the live-work space, and everyone deserves their own modern version. Hint: Keep it clean, clutter-free, and bright. Here are seven to inspire you to create your own happy, productive home office.
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  The oversize conference table in Bob Weinstein’s Manhattan live/work loft (like the cocktail table in the foreground) was designed by Jens Risom, and, he says, “supposedly came from the conference room of the Kinney Shoe Corporation.” Weinstein uses the table to display part of his Scandinavian pottery collection. Photo by Elizabeth Felicella.   Photo by: Elizabeth FelicellaCourtesy of: Justin Reid

    The oversize conference table in Bob Weinstein’s Manhattan live/work loft (like the cocktail table in the foreground) was designed by Jens Risom, and, he says, “supposedly came from the conference room of the Kinney Shoe Corporation.” Weinstein uses the table to display part of his Scandinavian pottery collection. Photo by Elizabeth Felicella. 

    Photo by: Elizabeth Felicella

    Courtesy of: Justin Reid

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  With a sizable portfolio packed with innovative home, restaurant, retail, and office design, Cara Cummins and Jose Tavel of TaC Studios took their strategies for their clients to their own home. When choosing a site, the dynamic duo felt passionate about staying in the neighborhood they were so dedicated to help transform—a central, historic Atlanta community once tainted by its industrial past and years of street crime. 

    With a sizable portfolio packed with innovative home, restaurant, retail, and office design, Cara Cummins and Jose Tavel of TaC Studios took their strategies for their clients to their own home. When choosing a site, the dynamic duo felt passionate about staying in the neighborhood they were so dedicated to help transform—a central, historic Atlanta community once tainted by its industrial past and years of street crime. 

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  Painter Kent Monkman’s Toronto house has a quiet presence, its front half hidden behind a fence of cedar two-by-sixes. Photo by Matthew Williams.   Photo by: Matthew WilliamsCourtesy of: matthew williams

    Painter Kent Monkman’s Toronto house has a quiet presence, its front half hidden behind a fence of cedar two-by-sixes. Photo by Matthew Williams. 

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Courtesy of: matthew williams

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  With broad expanses of white walls and perfectly modulated light, this space is the very picture of an artist’s studio—and it was crafted as carefully as Monkman’s mountain landscape. Photo by Matthew Williams.  Photo by: Matthew WilliamsCourtesy of: matthew williams

    With broad expanses of white walls and perfectly modulated light, this space is the very picture of an artist’s studio—and it was crafted as carefully as Monkman’s mountain landscape. Photo by Matthew Williams.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Courtesy of: matthew williams

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  Both a gallery and a residence, an Antwerp home redefines the boundaries between public and private, art and interior design. With the help of architect Bart Lens, Veerle Wenes and Bob Christiaens merged a 19th-century building with a 1970s one to create a combined home and art gallery in Antwerp. In the dining room downstairs, Wenes entertains family, friends, and gallery visitors. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.   Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Both a gallery and a residence, an Antwerp home redefines the boundaries between public and private, art and interior design. With the help of architect Bart Lens, Veerle Wenes and Bob Christiaens merged a 19th-century building with a 1970s one to create a combined home and art gallery in Antwerp. In the dining room downstairs, Wenes entertains family, friends, and gallery visitors. Photo by Tim Van de Velde. 

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  Images by Raw Color hang in a room upstairs at the Antwerp gallery/residence. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.   Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    Images by Raw Color hang in a room upstairs at the Antwerp gallery/residence. Photo by Tim Van de Velde. 

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  In southwest England, interior designer and avid furniture collector Kathryn Tyler built her home around the vintage pieces she’d amassed over a decade. Photo by Andrew Meredith.   Courtesy of: Andrew Meredith

    In southwest England, interior designer and avid furniture collector Kathryn Tyler built her home around the vintage pieces she’d amassed over a decade. Photo by Andrew Meredith. 

    Courtesy of: Andrew Meredith

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  Clerestory windows in Tyler's design studio provide plenty of light, while built-in bookshelves and flat files offer ample storage. Photo by Andrew Meredith.   Photo by: Andrew MeredithCourtesy of: Andrew Meredith 2007

    Clerestory windows in Tyler's design studio provide plenty of light, while built-in bookshelves and flat files offer ample storage. Photo by Andrew Meredith. 

    Photo by: Andrew Meredith

    Courtesy of: Andrew Meredith 2007

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  Richard Cook, a principal at Cook + Fox Architects, surveyed the Near Westside’s inventory of vacant structures and arrived at a conclusion that would guide the design of the Live Work Home. “The last thing in the world that the Near Westside needed was another house, whether it’s green or otherwise,” he says. “What it needed was a new prototype.”   Photo by: Richard BarnesCourtesy of: © Richard Barnes

    Richard Cook, a principal at Cook + Fox Architects, surveyed the Near Westside’s inventory of vacant structures and arrived at a conclusion that would guide the design of the Live Work Home. “The last thing in the world that the Near Westside needed was another house, whether it’s green or otherwise,” he says. “What it needed was a new prototype.” 

    Photo by: Richard Barnes

    Courtesy of: © Richard Barnes

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  Just the right amount of colorful clutter can inspire, as in the live-work space of Los Angeles artist artist Kii Arens. A stack of his work sits in the space's front window. Photo by Bradford Shellhammer.   Photo by: Bradford Shellhammer

    Just the right amount of colorful clutter can inspire, as in the live-work space of Los Angeles artist artist Kii Arens. A stack of his work sits in the space's front window. Photo by Bradford Shellhammer. 

    Photo by: Bradford Shellhammer

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