8 Spiral Staircases

written by:
December 18, 2013
Somewhere between the Villa Savoye and shag-carpeted condos in Mammoth, the spiral staircase lost its way. Architects have brought it back in as an efficient, space-saving way of getting from here to there. Here are our favorites from our pages.
  • 
  At Craig Steely's Lava Flow house on the Big Island, the spiral stairs were fabricated in the Bay Area and shipped in the same container as the furniture. Photo by Linny Morris.   Photo by: Linny Morris

    At Craig Steely's Lava Flow house on the Big Island, the spiral stairs were fabricated in the Bay Area and shipped in the same container as the furniture. Photo by Linny Morris. 

    Photo by: Linny Morris

  • 
  How is a 921-square-foot, 44-level house possible? Witness Tokyo architect Akihisa Hirata’s mind-bending, shape-shifting solution to small-space living. Ran and her brother, Gen, read on one of the structure’s 44 continuous steps.   Photo by: Koichi Torimura

    How is a 921-square-foot, 44-level house possible? Witness Tokyo architect Akihisa Hirata’s mind-bending, shape-shifting solution to small-space living. Ran and her brother, Gen, read on one of the structure’s 44 continuous steps. 

    Photo by: Koichi Torimura

  • 
  A renovation transforms a concrete water tower into a six-story living space that rises high above the surrounding scenery in Belgium.

 The master bedroom on the fifth floor boasts a circular dome ceiling. A spiral staircase leads up through the ceiling to the upper level. Here, the application of wedge wood on the floors helps to reflect a warm, reddish color onto the wall, contrasting the mirrored surfaces. 

    A renovation transforms a concrete water tower into a six-story living space that rises high above the surrounding scenery in Belgium.

 The master bedroom on the fifth floor boasts a circular dome ceiling. A spiral staircase leads up through the ceiling to the upper level. Here, the application of wedge wood on the floors helps to reflect a warm, reddish color onto the wall, contrasting the mirrored surfaces. 

  • 
  This flower shop, art gallery, and home for two looks like the simplest of cubes. Fitting it all into 1,115 square feet, however, prompted Japanese architect Makoto Tanijiri to think outside the box.A steel spiral staircase efficiently links all three floors. With no interior doors, Yurika can keep an ear on the shop from upstairs while maintaining the privacy of her home with the help of the vertical distance. Photo by Takashi Homma.   Photo by: Takashi Homma

    This flower shop, art gallery, and home for two looks like the simplest of cubes. Fitting it all into 1,115 square feet, however, prompted Japanese architect Makoto Tanijiri to think outside the box.A steel spiral staircase efficiently links all three floors. With no interior doors, Yurika can keep an ear on the shop from upstairs while maintaining the privacy of her home with the help of the vertical distance. Photo by Takashi Homma. 

    Photo by: Takashi Homma

  • 
  Teaming up with architect Craig Steely, an industrial designer and a mechanical engineer find just the right design for a striking home on a San Francisco hill. The trip from garage to first floor is through a wood-clad spiral staircase that resembles a giant slatted barrel. Photo by Ian Allen.   Photo by: Ian Allen

    Teaming up with architect Craig Steely, an industrial designer and a mechanical engineer find just the right design for a striking home on a San Francisco hill. The trip from garage to first floor is through a wood-clad spiral staircase that resembles a giant slatted barrel. Photo by Ian Allen. 

    Photo by: Ian Allen

  • 
  A San Francisco house that survived the Great Quake and the intervening decades is reborn after a serious intervention by modernist architect David Baker. A spiral staircase descends from the glass deck to the rain garden, which replaced a concrete pad. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.   Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    A San Francisco house that survived the Great Quake and the intervening decades is reborn after a serious intervention by modernist architect David Baker. A spiral staircase descends from the glass deck to the rain garden, which replaced a concrete pad. Photo by Dave Lauridsen. 

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

  • 
  Behind an unassuming 19th-century facade in Singapore's Joo Chiat neighborhood, Ching Ian and Yang Yeo's renovation of a typical shophouse venerates tradition while looking squarely to the future. Yeo descends the spiral staircase that connects the public and private spaces while Ian relaxes on a pair of Cappellini Superlight 750 sofas designed by Barber Osgerby. The Gwapa lounge chair and ottoman in the corner were designed by Marcel Wanders. Photo by Richard Powers.

    Behind an unassuming 19th-century facade in Singapore's Joo Chiat neighborhood, Ching Ian and Yang Yeo's renovation of a typical shophouse venerates tradition while looking squarely to the future. Yeo descends the spiral staircase that connects the public and private spaces while Ian relaxes on a pair of Cappellini Superlight 750 sofas designed by Barber Osgerby. The Gwapa lounge chair and ottoman in the corner were designed by Marcel Wanders. Photo by Richard Powers.

  • 
  In a London house that’s flooded with light, a spiral staircase provides a prismatic path from floor to floor. Photo by John Short.   Photo by: John Short

    In a London house that’s flooded with light, a spiral staircase provides a prismatic path from floor to floor. Photo by John Short. 

    Photo by: John Short

@current / @total

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...