7 Modern Shingled Houses

written by:
February 7, 2014
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  A creative twist on the traditional shingle clads a Connecticut home. Adventurous but subtle. Something different that doesn’t scream for attention. These were the prompts John and Erika Jessen gave to architect Elijah Huge for the addition to their 1920s home in New Haven, Connecticut. With those in mind, Huge set out to find a cladding material that was both eye-catching and cost-effective. “They wanted the skin to be exciting,” he says. “I thought the shingles would be a good choice because they would echo the texture of the existing house without trying to imitate it.” Even better, the stamped recycled aluminum shingles cost just two dollars per square foot—on par with run-of-the-mill vinyl siding, which “wasn’t an option!” exclaims Huge.      This originally appeared in Color Coded: 7 Vibrant Exteriors .

    A creative twist on the traditional shingle clads a Connecticut home. Adventurous but subtle. Something different that doesn’t scream for attention. These were the prompts John and Erika Jessen gave to architect Elijah Huge for the addition to their 1920s home in New Haven, Connecticut. With those in mind, Huge set out to find a cladding material that was both eye-catching and cost-effective. “They wanted the skin to be exciting,” he says. “I thought the shingles would be a good choice because they would echo the texture of the existing house without trying to imitate it.” Even better, the stamped recycled aluminum shingles cost just two dollars per square foot—on par with run-of-the-mill vinyl siding, which “wasn’t an option!” exclaims Huge.

     

    This originally appeared in Color Coded: 7 Vibrant Exteriors .
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  A self-taught designer embarks upon a solo mission to resuscitate a 19th-century homestead in upstate New York. A section of the farmhouse’s original shingled roof peeks out from under the new, raised ceiling in the master bedroom.Photo by Mark Mahaney.   Photo by Mark Mahaney.   This originally appeared in Hope Floats.

    A self-taught designer embarks upon a solo mission to resuscitate a 19th-century homestead in upstate New York. A section of the farmhouse’s original shingled roof peeks out from under the new, raised ceiling in the master bedroom.Photo by Mark Mahaney. 

    Photo by Mark Mahaney.
    This originally appeared in Hope Floats.
  • 
  Like a little chapel on the prairie, architect Jean-Baptiste Barache’s simply elegant retreat in the tiny Normandy town of Auvillier is a modern play on centuries-old forms and technology. “I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half. Photo by Céline Clanet.     This originally appeared in 10 Modern Gables.

    Like a little chapel on the prairie, architect Jean-Baptiste Barache’s simply elegant retreat in the tiny Normandy town of Auvillier is a modern play on centuries-old forms and technology. “I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half. Photo by Céline Clanet. 

    This originally appeared in 10 Modern Gables.
  • 
  In Seattle, where others saw only a severe slope and lack of municipal hookups, one couple spotted their ticket to their dream home. Anchored upon 11 piers, it’s clad in colored strips of asphalt roll roofing that read as oversize shingles, an affordable siding alternative chosen to resemble bark. Photo by Philip Newton.   Photo by Philip Newton.   This originally appeared in A New Slant.

    In Seattle, where others saw only a severe slope and lack of municipal hookups, one couple spotted their ticket to their dream home. Anchored upon 11 piers, it’s clad in colored strips of asphalt roll roofing that read as oversize shingles, an affordable siding alternative chosen to resemble bark. Photo by Philip Newton. 

    Photo by Philip Newton.
    This originally appeared in A New Slant.
  • 
  A resourceful sound mixer sources some local design talent, rolls up his sleeves, and builds small, green, and affordable in Bozeman, Montana. A handful of boxy protrusions on the bonderized steel shingled facade give the modernist residence an additional three-dimensionality. The colorful window frames and door also give variety and depth to the gray structure. Photo by John Clark.   Photo by John Clark.   This originally appeared in Green and Affordable Living in Montana.

    A resourceful sound mixer sources some local design talent, rolls up his sleeves, and builds small, green, and affordable in Bozeman, Montana. A handful of boxy protrusions on the bonderized steel shingled facade give the modernist residence an additional three-dimensionality. The colorful window frames and door also give variety and depth to the gray structure. Photo by John Clark. 

    Photo by John Clark.
    This originally appeared in Green and Affordable Living in Montana.
  • 
  A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade of the designer's house on Block Island. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog. Photo by Floto + Warner.   Photo by Floto + Warner.   This originally appeared in Jens Risom's Block Island Family Retreat.

    A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade of the designer's house on Block Island. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog. Photo by Floto + Warner. 

    Photo by Floto + Warner.
    This originally appeared in Jens Risom's Block Island Family Retreat.
  • 
  Canada's Magdalen Islands offer a seaside retreat to landlocked Quebecers, two of whom have turned the local vernacular on its oreille with a winsome vacation home. The modern blue facade continues upward to the roof shingles. Photo by Matthew Monteith.    Photo by Matthew Monteith.   This originally appeared in Blue in the Facade.

    Canada's Magdalen Islands offer a seaside retreat to landlocked Quebecers, two of whom have turned the local vernacular on its oreille with a winsome vacation home. The modern blue facade continues upward to the roof shingles. Photo by Matthew Monteith.

     

    Photo by Matthew Monteith.
    This originally appeared in Blue in the Facade.
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