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10 tips for clutter-free bedrooms

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For our first post in a series featuring inspiring, clutter-free rooms, we begin with the space that is arguably the most important to keep clear of all visual noise: the bedroom.
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  In a teeny, tiny San Francisco house tucked into the side of a hill, a curtain wall obscures the closet in the master bedroom, creating an instant sense of peace. A low horizontal shelf holds all necessities and grounds the space. Photo by Zubin Shroff.  Photo by: Zubin Shroff

    In a teeny, tiny San Francisco house tucked into the side of a hill, a curtain wall obscures the closet in the master bedroom, creating an instant sense of peace. A low horizontal shelf holds all necessities and grounds the space. Photo by Zubin Shroff.

    Photo by: Zubin Shroff

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  This flower shop, art gallery, and home for two in Nagoya, Japan, looks like the simplest of cubes. Fitting it all into 1,115 square feet, however, prompted architect Makoto Tanijiri to think outside the box. White dominates the bedroom, allowing the focus to be the serene cherry trees beyond. Photo by Takashi Homma.  Photo by: Takashi Homma

    This flower shop, art gallery, and home for two in Nagoya, Japan, looks like the simplest of cubes. Fitting it all into 1,115 square feet, however, prompted architect Makoto Tanijiri to think outside the box. White dominates the bedroom, allowing the focus to be the serene cherry trees beyond. Photo by Takashi Homma.

    Photo by: Takashi Homma

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  Living small is par for the course in New York City, but accommodating a family of four in under 700 square feet rarely looks as effortless as in this smart renovation. Storage under the bed and floor hides clutter in the master bedroom. Photo by Raimund Koch.  Photo by: Raimund Koch

    Living small is par for the course in New York City, but accommodating a family of four in under 700 square feet rarely looks as effortless as in this smart renovation. Storage under the bed and floor hides clutter in the master bedroom. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  Another angle of the bedroom in the small New York apartment shows that although the bed takes up nearly the entire master bedroom, a solid accent wall and select artworks, in place of stuff, makes the space feel open and soothing. The wide window keeps the tiny box light. Photo by Raimund Koch.  Photo by: Raimund Koch

    Another angle of the bedroom in the small New York apartment shows that although the bed takes up nearly the entire master bedroom, a solid accent wall and select artworks, in place of stuff, makes the space feel open and soothing. The wide window keeps the tiny box light. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  Built for a young family of Spartan-minded clients, architect Felix Oesch's spare, concrete prefab outside Zurich is a marvel of clean living. In the master bedroom, the residents incorporated a large storage cupboard into the design, and put everything in it. A vertical mirror tempers the severity of the concrete. Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.   Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

    Built for a young family of Spartan-minded clients, architect Felix Oesch's spare, concrete prefab outside Zurich is a marvel of clean living. In the master bedroom, the residents incorporated a large storage cupboard into the design, and put everything in it. A vertical mirror tempers the severity of the concrete. Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

     

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  When Svetlin Krastev and Dessi Nikolova had their second child, they saw two options: go broke buying a bigger apartment, or renovate their existing 620-square-foot home. A series of floor-to-ceiling cabinets that meld into the white room eliminate all signs of clutter, while the youngest resident learns about organizing. Seldom-needed stuff (luggage, winter clothes) is stashed in the higher cabinets. “Believe it or not, we have empty cabinets,” says Nikolova. “There’s space for everything.” Photo by David Allee.  Photo by: David Allee

    When Svetlin Krastev and Dessi Nikolova had their second child, they saw two options: go broke buying a bigger apartment, or renovate their existing 620-square-foot home. A series of floor-to-ceiling cabinets that meld into the white room eliminate all signs of clutter, while the youngest resident learns about organizing. Seldom-needed stuff (luggage, winter clothes) is stashed in the higher cabinets. “Believe it or not, we have empty cabinets,” says Nikolova. “There’s space for everything.” Photo by David Allee.

    Photo by: David Allee

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  For a house in Phoenix, Arizona, Cy Keener's bedroom is on the far end the Spartan scale, but shows an interesting approach to balancing color. The gray floor and ceiling offset the white walls to add texture without adding clutter. The room contains a bed, a pair of boots, and a selection of books—and nothing else. Photo by Ye Rin Mok.   Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

    For a house in Phoenix, Arizona, Cy Keener's bedroom is on the far end the Spartan scale, but shows an interesting approach to balancing color. The gray floor and ceiling offset the white walls to add texture without adding clutter. The room contains a bed, a pair of boots, and a selection of books—and nothing else. Photo by Ye Rin Mok.

     

    Photo by: Ye Rin Mok

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  The  austere bedroom in Thomas Bercy’s Texas residence is warmed by wood paneling and a curtain running the length of the window wall. Photo by Denise Prince Martin.  Photo by: Denise Prince Martin

    The  austere bedroom in Thomas Bercy’s Texas residence is warmed by wood paneling and a curtain running the length of the window wall. Photo by Denise Prince Martin.

    Photo by: Denise Prince Martin

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  To maximize every square inch in this Manhattan apartment, LOT-EK knocked down walls, added dozens of recycled doors, and built in a bevy of secret compartments. The residents combined two bedrooms into one and added a narrow closet behind the bed to stash everything, and even had room for a revolving dry-cleaning rack to help the couple avoid digging for shirts. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.   Photo by: Nicholas CalcottCourtesy of: Copyright: 2010 Nicholas Calcott.  All rights reserved.

    To maximize every square inch in this Manhattan apartment, LOT-EK knocked down walls, added dozens of recycled doors, and built in a bevy of secret compartments. The residents combined two bedrooms into one and added a narrow closet behind the bed to stash everything, and even had room for a revolving dry-cleaning rack to help the couple avoid digging for shirts. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.

     

    Photo by: Nicholas Calcott

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2010 Nicholas Calcott. All rights reserved.

  • 
  In the bedroom portion of the upstairs studio in a couple's house in Manhattan Beach, California, a vintage Japanese indigo quilt from the Rose Bowl Swap Meet lies folded on the end of the George Nelson-designed bed, which is flanked by an Architectural Pottery floor lantern. When shut, barn-style closet doors completely hide the well-stocked closet. The resident holds himself to a strict one-in-one-out rule for every new addition to the home. “It’s the perfect gut check,” he says. “As much as I believe that things do have meaning, editing is cathartic. It’s good to not get too attached to stuff.” Photo by Dave Lauridsen.   Photo by: Dave Lauridsen
    In the bedroom portion of the upstairs studio in a couple's house in Manhattan Beach, California, a vintage Japanese indigo quilt from the Rose Bowl Swap Meet lies folded on the end of the George Nelson-designed bed, which is flanked by an Architectural Pottery floor lantern. When shut, barn-style closet doors completely hide the well-stocked closet. The resident holds himself to a strict one-in-one-out rule for every new addition to the home. “It’s the perfect gut check,” he says. “As much as I believe that things do have meaning, editing is cathartic. It’s good to not get too attached to stuff.” Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

     

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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