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October 24, 2013
It’s readily available, affordable, fairly sustainable, and hardy—what’s not to love about pine? Architects, designers, and homeowners show us how to use the wood to its best advantage in these eight homes from our archives.
Bornstein and his daughter Velma sit at a table the architect designed himself; the dining chairs were designed by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen.

Architect Per Bornstein and his daughter Velma sit at a table the architect designed himself in the pine-dominated dining room of their house in Sweden; the dining chairs were designed by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen. Photo by Pia Ulin.

 

 

 

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Originally appeared in Knotty by Nature
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Inside the main living area, tongue-and-grooved white pine covers the walls and vaulted ceilings, and a red closet door, built of salvaged pine from the original house, slides open and closed on barn track hardware.

Inside the main living area of architect Chad Everhart's farmhouse near Boone, North Carolina, tongue-and-groove white pine covers the walls and vaulted ceilings, and a red closet door, built of salvaged pine from the original house, slides along barn-track hardware. Image courtesy Chad Everhart Architect.

Originally appeared in Farm House Redux
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Hald Strand Summerhouse dining room portrait.

For his family’s summerhouse in North Zealand, Denmark, architect Jesper Brask goes full tilt with native wood and playful geometries. Niels and Jens hang out in the dining area. Like the wall behind it, the table was crafted from the felled trees. The floor is soap-treated pine found offsite. Photo by Karina Tengberg. 

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Originally appeared in A Coastal Summer Home in Denmark
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living room trailer malibu

Sofie Howard and Grant Shumate in the living room of their Malibu trailer, where pine brightens the new built-ins. Commune designer Steven Johanknecht introduced the custom daybeds with storage beneath. The carpet-fragment pillows are from Commune, as is the table, designed by Joshua Tree–based sculptor Alma Allen. The poster is by Mike Mills. Photo by Spencer Lowell.

 

 

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Originally appeared in A Modern Beachside Trailer Home in Malibu
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The home's upper floor features copious amounts of untreated pine. Five large cross-braces keep the timber frame rigid. The royal blue Ikea kitchen, Noguchi Cyclone dining table for Knoll, and Karim Rashid Oh chairs for Umbra all made the trip from the ma

Set into the dense tropical foliage of Hawaii’s wildest coast is a house that goes with the flow by welcoming the breeze. The home's upper floor features copious amounts of untreated pine. Five large cross-braces keep the timber frame rigid. Photo by Linny Morris.

 

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Originally appeared in Lava Flow 4, The Big Island
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goodman residence dining room gabled ceiling wood beams

Architect Preston Scott Cohen resurrected an early 1800s barn in Pine Plains, New York, as a vacation home for a literary couple and their family. The three major anchor beams were hewn from a single tall yellow pine. Photo by Raimund Koch.

 

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Originally appeared in Raising the Barn
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The outside deck, made of local celery-top pine, welcomes both humans and the natural landscape further into the house.

Aaron Roberts and Thomas Bailey, the young architects behind room11, teamed up to design a house for Aaron's parents, fixing the structure into the topography of the site. The outside deck, made of local celery-top pine, welcomes both humans and the natural landscape further into the house. Photo by Andrew Rowat.

 

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Originally appeared in Kingston Brio
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Modern kitchen with hoop pine plywood countertops

Inspired by tansu chests and raw materials that show patina, a pair of Sydney-based architects renovated their own home—slowly. The kitchen is built from hoop pine plywood, including the countertops and front of the refrigerator. The leather drawer-pulls will patina over time.

Originally appeared in Almost Perfect
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Bornstein and his daughter Velma sit at a table the architect designed himself; the dining chairs were designed by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen.

Architect Per Bornstein and his daughter Velma sit at a table the architect designed himself in the pine-dominated dining room of their house in Sweden; the dining chairs were designed by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen. Photo by Pia Ulin.

 

 

 

Photo by Pia Ulin.

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