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November 25, 2013
Shoji screens are used everywhere from George Nakashima's Reception House to actor Vincent Kartheiser's tiny Hollywood bungalow, and they remain a time-tested way of allowing light in and keeping clutter behind the scenes. Here are 10 clever ways to show some shoji style.
In one house, a small kitchen features a cupboard with sliding shoji screens.

Abrams' 2011 Artists' Handmade Houses features beautiful images by Don Freeman and text by Michael Gotkin. Here we look at the homes of Russel Wright, Paolo Soleri, and George Nakashima. Nakashima's small kitchen features a cupboard with sliding shoji screens.

Originally appeared in Artists' Handmade Houses
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The living room in Nakashima's Reception House features several Greenrock ottomans and a Buckeye burl coffee table. The complex also includes a pool, arched pool house, workshop barn, and studio, among other structures.

The living room in Nakashima's Reception House features several Greenrock ottomans and a Buckeye burl coffee table, and more shoji screens at the windows. 

Originally appeared in Artists' Handmade Houses
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hollywood cabin loft dining room

Mad Men’s Vincent Kartheiser has all he needs in his compact, 580-square-foot Hollywood abode, where shoji screens run along one wall and conceal his closet. Photo by Joe Pugliese. 

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Originally appeared in The Tiny Hollywood Home of Mad Men's Vincent Kartheiser
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hollywood cabin loft bathroom sink

The custom screens, designed by Funn Roberts, not only conceal the closet, but extend to provide privacy for the adjacent shower and soaking tub. Photo by Joe Pugliese. 

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Originally appeared in The Tiny Hollywood Home of Mad Men's Vincent Kartheiser
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The kitchen and Baker's home office, which has artwork and inspiration pinned above the desk, are aligned behind sliding fiberglass-and-bamboo shoji screens. Devoid of cabinetry, the kitchen is fitted out with industrial cantilevered shelving from E-Z She

The kitchen of architect David Baker's San Francisco home is aligned behind sliding fiberglass-and-bamboo shoji screens. Devoid of cabinetry, the room is fitted out with industrial cantilevered shelving from E-Z Shelving Systems in Kansas City. The red tiles behind the stove are from Heath Ceramics. Photo by Dave Lauridsen. 

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Originally appeared in Mission Statement
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Minimalist neutral colored kitchen design

For Katie and Scott McDonald, moving into a Rhode Island family home meant recasting the previously renovated house as a sanctuary of peaceful, Japanese-inspired design. “The meditation room is where we get our Japanese ya-yas out,” says Scott. “I wanted yukimi, which means ‘snow-viewing,’ shoji screens because they open from the bottom as well as side to side. Glen Collins, a guy in Oakland, California, is the one American I could find whose company makes them.” Photo by John Horner. 

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Courtesy of 
COPYRIGHT 2011, JOHN HORNER
Originally appeared in New McDonald
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In the hallway of a Toronto renovation, a set of sliders shows off a mix of influences from shoji to Schindler, with multitoned wood reflecting the sunlight. Photo by Juliana Sohn. 

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Originally appeared in Inside Job
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Plastic and steel house in Hiroshima Japan with luminescent facade by Suppose

Daisuke Tokuyama told Japanese architect Makoto Tanijiri that he wanted a light-filled home for his family of five—a tall order, considering his narrow property in Hiroshima was boxed in on three sides. To creatively solve the problem, Tanijiri skipped conventional walls altogether and, taking the shoji concept to a new level, wrapped the entire three-story steel structure in polycarbonate plastic. Photo by Toshiyuki Yano.

 

 

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Originally appeared in Glowing Box Home in Japan
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Modern bathroom with red Knoll chair and metal towel racks

Architect Maurice McKenzie borrowed the shoji concept throughout a 1980 home he designed in Borrego Springs, California, with light woods and industrial-strength paper. Photo by JUCO. 

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Originally appeared in Modern Home in a California Resort Town
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Bathroom with composting toilet and found wood table

A family discovers the joys of DIY design—and muddy feet—in their home made up of distinct pods that blends harmoniously with its surroundings in the rainy mountains of Kauai. The bathroom walls and the shower are made out of polycarbonate, based on a shoji screen model that allows light in. 

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Originally appeared in Grateful Shed
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In one house, a small kitchen features a cupboard with sliding shoji screens.

Abrams' 2011 Artists' Handmade Houses features beautiful images by Don Freeman and text by Michael Gotkin. Here we look at the homes of Russel Wright, Paolo Soleri, and George Nakashima. Nakashima's small kitchen features a cupboard with sliding shoji screens.

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