Latest Articles in Travel

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Salone 2012: EuroCucina

This year, at almost every stall at Eurocucina we felt at home, noticing a serious trend in kitchens and living rooms coming together. Whether the consequence of our shrinking urban environments, or comfort and functionality trumping tradition, the kitchen now dominates as the social center of the home, and companies are designing accordingly. The integration of table tops of all shapes, depths, heights and sizes, and in some cases even couches, into the kitchen, sent a clear and convincing message: the dining room is dead. Here are ten examples of the newest in kitchen design from Eurocucina, any of which we would be happy hanging out in.
April 24, 2012
Ventura Lambrate RCA mylar

Ventura Lambrate Trumps in Milan

For the second year running, Milan’s Zona Tortona feels more like Zona Tortura, a nightclub dotted with big brand showrooms, than the former creative epicenter of the Salone furniture fair that it has been for years. Dance music pulses out of black-curtained buildings past the large men (bouncers?) dressed in black suits that guard them while costumed kids handed out free drink tickets. For those seeking a slower-tempo compliment to the commercial fair center at Tortona, the best relief is Ventura Lambrate, where the warehouses surrounding the polytechnic university—themselves beautiful objects of architectural design—are filled with student work, some fresh takes on old products and materials, and design that borders on art. Check out our slideshow of what to see at Ventura Lambrate.
April 20, 2012
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Friday Finds 04.20.12

On this Friday, we share a residence in Whistler, a wind map of the United States, a project that pays homage to Miami's now-demolished Orange Bowl, and more. Scroll down for the full story.
April 20, 2012
modern design hotel in Berlin, Germany

Propeller Island Hotel, Berlin

In 1997, musician Lars Storschen started renting out rooms in his house to supplement his income. Bored with the idea of a traditional guest room, Storschen created different themes for each of the four rooms. Inspired by Jules Vernes’ science fiction novel, Propeller Island, Storschen’s guestrooms-cum art installations, like Symbols (A room filled with 300 symbols) became an extension of his career as an artist. Soon after, the rooms became popular and Storschen began toying with the idea of expanding Propeller Island into a proper hotel. When the pension hotel in his building became available, Storschen bought it and spent the next five years expanding. Now, with three floors and 27 rooms, Propeller Island is part art gallery and part hotel. It’s impractical and slightly gimmicky, but I love Storschen’s madcap approach and imaginative décor. Click through the slideshow to view my favorite rooms.
April 14, 2012
Hau tree overview

Hau Tree Lanai in Honolulu

I was in Honolulu, Hawaii, last week to talk at a green design conference, and in my two quick days there I was able to see a few of the sights. Though I managed to eat at some trendy, and rather well-designed spots—tip of the cap to Salt and Morimoto—I was reminded of a fundamental lesson of design over a decidedly unhip breakfast at the Hau Tree Lanai Restaurant at the New Otani Kaimana Beach Hotel. Sometimes a single element of a space's design (in this case, the hau tree) can make it so magical that the fetishism so often shown for meticulously sourced tablewares and organic pork belly goes completely out the window. Located down at the Diamond Head–end of Waikiki in an unspiffy old hotel, on a pretty but pedestrian stretch of beach, the Hau Tree Lanai eschews just about every design trick in the book—see the pink tablecloths, white wrought-iron patio furniture, and institutional tile floor. But that hau tree creates such a perfect canopy, shielding diners from the hot sun while giving us this ribbon-width view of the flat blue sea, that you don't want to be anywhere else. 
April 13, 2012
use of fire and energy in the home

Fire in the Home 101

Taming fire was humankind’s first and most critical step toward its mastery of the material world. About 400,000 years ago, our ancestors learned to harness the flame, setting us on the course that would lead from the stone hearths those early humans built to the modern high-efficiency catalytic woodstoves we use today. More important, though, was the capacity to selectively apply heat, a transformative power that allows us to turn dirt into metal, cold into warmth, dark into light.
April 11, 2012
colour makes me happy clog wall

Colour Makes People Happy

Located on a quiet suburban street in South London, the shop Colour Makes People Happy is painted in a surprisingly subtle shade of sage green. Rainbow colored signage adorns the windows and a faded yellow bicycle is parked up outside, the picture of whimsical charm. The interior is no different, decked out with bunting and paper decorations; sixty colorful clogs are arranged into neat grids that line the walls alongside towers of stacked paint tins.
April 11, 2012
Bryant lamp by Schoolhouse Electric

Accessories from Schoolhouse Electric

I have always associated the Portland-based company Schoolhouse Electric solely with classic, vintage-inspired lighting, and only recently discovered that they sell much more than that in their retail showroom and online. Here are some of my favorite finds. Most of them are made in America, most are somewhat affordable, and all will add a stylish accent to your living space. Now's a great time to check out the site and pick up some treats for yourself or as gifts; they're offering 30% off on selected items as part of their "spring cleaning" sale.
April 10, 2012
davd rasmussen cafe plate

Cafe Trays by David Rasmussen Design

Colorado-based designer David Rasmussen recently released a line of wooden cafe trays that is the perfect blend of modern-meets-craft. What started out as a small commission for a local restaurant blossomed into full-fledged product series. "The first ones I made got such rave reviews that I decided to make a second batch," says Rasmussen. "I sold those about as fast as I could churn them out. Then, I refined the process of making them and diversified the line by adding three new sizes and started producing them this spring." Carved with a CNC router and finished by hand, these plates come in maple or walnut with a neon trim and were launched at the AD Home show in Los Angeles. The plates come four sizes and retail for $42 to $52 a piece. For more information, click here.
April 9, 2012