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July 20, 2012

Reclaimed shipping containers are ideal nesting spots for the residents of these five homes. Whether lured by the relatively inexpensive costs, ready supply, or aesthetic charm of containers, the residents applied their own perspective on how to reclaim and adapt these industrial castoffs. Click though our slideshow to see more.

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Jon Ahrens of <a href="http://madroneldc.com/">Madrone Landscaping</a>, who layed out the plantings around the container, implemented a green roof on a drip watering system. The cantilevered overhang at rear is planted with cacti.
Though this Texas garden retreat and guesthouse is only 8' x 40', it features all the comforts of a larger house: floor-to-ceiling glass doors and windows, heating and air-conditioning, a green roof, bamboo flooring and wallcoverings, a small sink and shower, and a composting toilet. “The green roof was an element that I had not thought of at the beginning, but as it turns out saves me more money on air-conditioning than the solar would have, and is a lot prettier,” says the resident.
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Originally appeared in Smaller in Texas
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Living room with shipping container room
Jeff Wardell and Claudia Sagan's loft in San Francisco's Pacific Heights neighborhood was formerly a Chinese laundry and a tooth powder factory. Now it's home to their impressive collection of contemporary art and two revamped shipping containers that house a guest room and office. Furniture designer and builder Pat Carson tricked out the container with exposed copper piping and a Murphy bed. See the entire gallery of photographs here.
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Originally appeared in Modern Shipping Container Home in San Francisco
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Hand-cranked aluminum bed
"We wanted a small bedroom, one that would be interesting and that our friends would go home and talk to everybody about, that they slept in something interesting—but not so interesting that they would want to move in," says resident Jeff Wardell. Watch this video about living with a shipping container.
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Originally appeared in Modern Shipping Container Home in San Francisco
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“A lot of the design was aimed at creating a sense of oasis,” says Shoup. Photo by building Lab inc.
Architect Stephen Shoup's Oakland, California, home was once the shop of the late master woodcarver Miles Karpilow. Two converted shipping containers make up the live-work spaces.
Courtesy of 
Eduado Soler
Originally appeared in Creative Re-Use in Oakland
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In the kitchen and dining area, Shoup used ipe wood and installed an energy-efficient hydronic radiant heating system in the concrete floor. “There’s a minimalism that drives the basic design gestures,” notes Shoup. “I tried to temper that with a compleme
The bright interior features a concrete floor with hydronic radiant heating system. “There’s a minimalism that drives the basic design gestures,” notes Shoup. “I tried to temper that with a complementary materials," he says. View the slideshow of the house here.
Originally appeared in Creative Re-Use in Oakland
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The 400-square-foot deck between the main house and guest quarters catches a cool breeze—a big bonus during Houston’s “super-summers”—and is often filled with the couple and their friends enjoying local microbrews. "The challenge was how to stitch togethe
Three containers make up the 1,538-square-foot Houston home of Kevin Freeman and Jen Feldman. The couple enlisted architect Christopher Robertson to design their abode. “I’ve always liked [shipping containers] for their texture and durability,” Robertson says. “The challenge was to build a legitimately sellable container house by making it feel like a typical home.” Read the full article here.
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Originally appeared in The Shipping Muse
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The couple had a big flat-screen TV but didn't want it to be the focus of the living room. Placed on the wall behind one of the red couches, it hangs quietly without drawing attention to itself but is in perfect position for TV-watching from the second co
Here's the living room, which is furnished with two red sofas from Room and Board and thrift store finds. “When we were furnishing the house, I thought, ‘Oh, no! Our fridge isn’t magnetic for [our son's] artwork,’ but then I realized the whole house is magnetic,” Feldmann says. “We’ve become magnet connoisseurs,” Freeman adds. See more of the home.
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Originally appeared in The Shipping Muse
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On the opposite side of the house stands an old oak grove; the views to it are enhanced by floor-to-ceiling sliding doors, which, when opened, create a natural breezeway through the house. Jantzen was able to sneak the roofline in just under an existing b
Architect Christof Jantzen turned to shipping containers to cut down construction costs on a renovation of his Topanga Canyon house. “Most of the prefab structures on the market are very expensive, so I tried developing these container structures that would bring the cost margin of prefab down, which I think should happen.”
Originally appeared in Self-Contained
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Jantzen sheathed the living area’s walls and floor in furniture-grade plywood paneling, behind which he placed thermal insulation to retain heat in the winter. He then sealed the ply in a water-based, low-VOC clearcoat to prevent any fumes from escaping f
“The containers are not only recycled, they’re very sturdy—stacking up to eight stories high on cargo ships—they are the perfect building material,” says Jantzen. View more of the home and see how a shipping container is craned into place.
Originally appeared in Self-Contained
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Jon Ahrens of <a href="http://madroneldc.com/">Madrone Landscaping</a>, who layed out the plantings around the container, implemented a green roof on a drip watering system. The cantilevered overhang at rear is planted with cacti.
Though this Texas garden retreat and guesthouse is only 8' x 40', it features all the comforts of a larger house: floor-to-ceiling glass doors and windows, heating and air-conditioning, a green roof, bamboo flooring and wallcoverings, a small sink and shower, and a composting toilet. “The green roof was an element that I had not thought of at the beginning, but as it turns out saves me more money on air-conditioning than the solar would have, and is a lot prettier,” says the resident. Photo by Chris Cooper.

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