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Young Guns

For our second annual Young Guns report, we scoured the globe for the emerging designers and products that you need to know now. In addition to tracking this year's vanguard, we also take a Second Look at what 2012's inaugural class is making and where its rising stars are headed.

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Philippe Malouin

From his studio in London’s Hackney Central borough, Philippe Malouin is constantly testing ideas. “It’s sort of a cross-pollination of failed experiments that eventually leads to something interesting,” he says. Malouin and his team of three often extrapolate a lesson and apply that to something else, like a “failed” attempt to create electronic components. From that emerged a structural system of sorts, which then yielded the truss-like Gridlock furniture series.

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Studio Juju

Since their debut at SaloneSatellite in 2009, Singaporean design duo Timo Wong and Priscilla Lui have been sprinting ahead of the competition. Appropriately, Rabbit and the Tortoise, one of their new table collections for Living Divani, was exhibited last year in Milan. Studio Juju was also selected by Satellite as one of the 15 design firms to celebrate the show’s 15th anniversary.

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Mermeladaestudio

Behind each of Mermeladaestudio’s many projects is a story: “We love to have products with meaning, products with a rich language and smart details to discover once you watch and use them,” the trio explains. Juan Miguel Juárez, Laura Blasco, and Alex Estévez met in a Barcelona design studio, where Juárez and Blasco worked on the design team and Estévez interned. The three collaborated so well that they founded their own studio in 2009.

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45 Kilo

True to their Bauhaus training, Berlin-based designers Philipp Schöpfer and Daniel Klapsing of 45 Kilo let craft, experimentation, and industrialized production shape their work. “Everything that surrounds us becomes important,” explains Schöpfer, “because we try to find new solutions.”

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Dögg Guðmundsdóttir

Art and design intertwine in the work of Copenhagen-based Dögg Guðmundsdóttir, whose creations range from the clean and contemporary to the ancient and elemental. Two major examples are her recent pieces for Ligne Roset: the rope-and-steel “Fifty” chairs designed with Rikke Rützou Arnved and two rugs whose primary motif mimics traditional Icelandic star embroidery.

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Lanzavecchia + Wai

With products ranging from lacy neck braces to a rug for Mercedes-Benz, the globe-trotting design duo Lanzavecchia + Wai’s professional wanderings are as peripatetic as their diverse origins.

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Pauline Deltour

As haute apprenticeships go, few have fared better than the French designer Pauline Deltour. After studying at the tony École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, she spent the late aughts in Munich working in the office of Konstantin Grcic. By 2009, she had struck out on her own, earning early commissions for Alessi (the A Tempo line of wire baskets) and Muji (a suite of wooden desk accessories). In 2013, Deltour’s multidisciplinary approach to product and installation design has been focused on the Salone Del Mobile furniture fair in Milan.

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