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8 Modern Grills Made for Cooking

Summer is here and you know what that means: outdoor grilling! Test drive those budding tastebuds by checking out our favorite eight grills below.

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Element Grill

$449.00-$649.00

When San Francisco–based Fuego came out with their first grill, the Fuego 01, in 2006, it was the antidote to the ubiquitous round tripod-foot grill, but it retailed for a hefty price of $3,500. This year, Fuego cofounders Alex Siow and Robert Brunner have introduced the Element by Fuego, a gas grill with a similarly sleek and modern design with a much lighter price tag.

“We wanted to create a grill that was affordable to all, and make something really special in the process,” says Brunner, who is also a founder of the Ammunition Group, the design firm responsible for the Arc kitchen hood by Zephyr, Kohler’s Karbon faucet, and Palm’s Think Outside folding keyboard.

Element 01 ($649) has a stainless finish, Element 02 ($549) is in powder-coated gray and Element 03 ($449) comes in white or apple red. Each houses a small propane tank, eliminating the need for fumey charcoal, and features a 24,000 btu dual-zone burner and roasting lid that hooks onto the side when not in use. A swingout wood prep tray is standard on the 01 and 02 models, and an optional pizza stone and cast-iron hot plate for maximum searing are also available.       —Erika Heet

 

Charcoal Picnic Grill by Bodum

Charcoal Picnic Grill

$49.95

Just browsing the cheery selection of enamel-coated steel charcoal barbeques from Bodum boosts our spirits with thoughts of the next afternoons spent grilling hot dogs and hamburgs in the breeze.

EcoQue portable grill

EcoQue Portable Grill

$125.00-0.00

If you love barbecuing over an open flame, but get choked up on the excess smoke and detest the amount of charcoal it takes to keep your grill going, then EcoQue has a solution. Its sleek, portable design uses 75 percent less fuel to cook than its convetntional counterparts. Plus, it collapses down to a thickness of just one inch—great for toting around and storing away.

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Mini Egg Grill

$379.00-$425.00

Dimentions: 12.5" H (19" H with stand) x 11.8" dia.
Weight: 30 pounds

Pros
The Big Green Eggs earned their hype for letting home cooks play grill master, smoker, and baker with just one appliance. The Eggs, inspired by Asian kamado cookers, feature two dampers for controlling temperatures, from 200 degrees Fahrenheit (for smoking) to 750 degrees (for searing).

Cons
Bigger can be better. To get the most out of your egg, you’ll need at least a Small (for baking bread, cookies, and pizzas) 
or a Large (for smoking your own turkey). Props if you can lift the Mini on your own; 
it weighs 30 pounds without the base.

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Chromed Bucket Grill

$40.00

The first clear, warm, and beautifully park-worthy day of the year in San Francisco had us thinking about the thrill of the grill: sun on your face, wind in your hair, burgers gently charred. Convenience is key when you'll be out and about and bbq-ing, and this bucket design from Sagaform allows you to tote your supplies to the picnic spot. Don't forget the buns!

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Smokey Joe Silver Portable Charcoal Grill

Dimentions: 17" H x 14.5" dia.
Weight: 8 pounds

Pros:
Weber’s Smokey Joe is a classic for a reason: It’s simply designed yet hardy and easy to use. This is the grill Goldilocks would choose. It’s not too big but not too small, not 
too heavy but not too light. Plus, at $35, 
the price is just right.

Cons
The bowl and lid are designed so you can control the temperature, but the small handholds quickly become too hot to 
handle (especially the lower of the two). Don’t take this grill apart to clean unless you have ample time to reassemble—–
and a knack for not losing small pieces.

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Portable Bucket Grill

$35.00

Dimentions: 11" H x 10.8" dia.
Weight: 3 pounds

Pros
A superfluous feature is not to be found on this barbecue. It’s super sleek and super light, weighing in at just three pounds. This grill is easy to move and so is its cooking grate. The handle lets you turn the surface and your patties over hot spots, then angles up to act as an edge for flipping.

Cons

Get ready for slow cooking. The barbecuing surface sits six inches above the charcoal grate, and there’s no lid to trap the heat. The Bucket Grill’s legs (not shown) prop its base just inches above the ground. 
The necessary investment in a comfy camper chair might negate its low price.

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