The Real Chicago

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photos by:
February 26, 2009
Originally published in American Modern
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  At Bari Foods on West Grand you can still get an Italian sub directly from the butcher.
    At Bari Foods on West Grand you can still get an Italian sub directly from the butcher.
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  The Lake Shore Drive bike path provides ample opportunity for outdoor recreation.
    The Lake Shore Drive bike path provides ample opportunity for outdoor recreation.
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  The Osaka Garden in Jackson Park provides a respite from the city.
    The Osaka Garden in Jackson Park provides a respite from the city.
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  The Green Mill Cocktail Lounge in the Uptown neighborhood plants you firmly in the middle of all the musical culture Chicago has to offer.
    The Green Mill Cocktail Lounge in the Uptown neighborhood plants you firmly in the middle of all the musical culture Chicago has to offer.
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  The Inland Steel building, by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, is one of Lynch’s favorites in a city that has plenty of architectural masterworks to choose from. “It’s so thin and so pure,” Lynch says.
    The Inland Steel building, by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, is one of Lynch’s favorites in a city that has plenty of architectural masterworks to choose from. “It’s so thin and so pure,” Lynch says.
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  The Lake Shore Drive bike path is also filled with architectural curiosities.
    The Lake Shore Drive bike path is also filled with architectural curiosities.
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  The home of the Chicago Cubs, Wrigley Field, is one of the city’s best-known landmarks.
    The home of the Chicago Cubs, Wrigley Field, is one of the city’s best-known landmarks.
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  Lynch calls the Music Box movie theater on Southport Avenue, designed by local architect Louis A. Simon in 1929, “the last great independent” in Chicago. If you go, watch out for the theater’s tireless protector, a ghost named Whitey who is said to still pace aisle four.
    Lynch calls the Music Box movie theater on Southport Avenue, designed by local architect Louis A. Simon in 1929, “the last great independent” in Chicago. If you go, watch out for the theater’s tireless protector, a ghost named Whitey who is said to still pace aisle four.
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