Oslo, Norway

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August 5, 2010
Originally published in Bright Ideas
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  The 400,000-square-foot Norwegian National Opera and Ballet, designed by the Oslo- and New York–based firm Snøhetta, features a plaza and roofscape conceived as a single glacierlike object entirely available to the public—–embracing what architect Tarald Lundevall calls the “Scandinavian idea of common ownership.”
    The 400,000-square-foot Norwegian National Opera and Ballet, designed by the Oslo- and New York–based firm Snøhetta, features a plaza and roofscape conceived as a single glacierlike object entirely available to the public—–embracing what architect Tarald Lundevall calls the “Scandinavian idea of common ownership.”
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  Tarald Lundevall may be uneasy about the sometimes unequal balance between the public interest and private development in the city, but his affection for Oslo’s architecture remains unambiguous.
    Tarald Lundevall may be uneasy about the sometimes unequal balance between the public interest and private development in the city, but his affection for Oslo’s architecture remains unambiguous.
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  David Adjaye’s conversion of a former train station into the Nobel Peace Center.
    David Adjaye’s conversion of a former train station into the Nobel Peace Center.
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  The still-formidable 14th-century Akershus fortress, which presides over Oslo Fjord.
    The still-formidable 14th-century Akershus fortress, which presides over Oslo Fjord.
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  The pool and fountains of Eidsvoll Square, a greensward that runs parallel to Oslo’s grand boulevard Karl Johans gate.
    The pool and fountains of Eidsvoll Square, a greensward that runs parallel to Oslo’s grand boulevard Karl Johans gate.
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  Aker Brygge, a former shipyard that’s now a mélange of apartments, offices, shops, and restaurants.
    Aker Brygge, a former shipyard that’s now a mélange of apartments, offices, shops, and restaurants.
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  A colorful corner of Grønland, a central Oslo district with a population expressive of the city’s ever-increasing multiculturalism.
    A colorful corner of Grønland, a central Oslo district with a population expressive of the city’s ever-increasing multiculturalism.
  • 
  The hippest thing about the 50-room Grims Grenka, Oslo’s first design hotel, isn’t the enclos­ed atrium (or the organic cocktails),it’s the short-stroll proximity to Akershus; the National Museum of Art, Architecture, and Design; and Karl Johans gate.
    The hippest thing about the 50-room Grims Grenka, Oslo’s first design hotel, isn’t the enclos­ed atrium (or the organic cocktails),it’s the short-stroll proximity to Akershus; the National Museum of Art, Architecture, and Design; and Karl Johans gate.
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  The Art Hall at Tullinlokka, beside the National Gallery, which serves as a venue for special exhibitions.
    The Art Hall at Tullinlokka, beside the National Gallery, which serves as a venue for special exhibitions.
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