Mumbai, India

written by:
photos by:
June 3, 2010
Originally published in Megacities

A churning metropolis defined by its Indian, English, and Portuguese past, Mumbai, India, now has the poise, populace, and design potential to be one of the 21st century’s most interesting cities.

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  A streetside vegetable purveyor shows his offerings.
    A streetside vegetable purveyor shows his offerings.
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  An impromptu cricket game occupies locals in Navi Mumbai.
    An impromptu cricket game occupies locals in Navi Mumbai.
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  The iconic Gateway of India was built in 1911 to welcome England’s King George V.
    The iconic Gateway of India was built in 1911 to welcome England’s King George V.
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  Modern skyscrapers loom over large swaths of coastline.
    Modern skyscrapers loom over large swaths of coastline.
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  The Leopold Cafe is a popular local haunt.
    The Leopold Cafe is a popular local haunt.
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  Marine Drive, also known as the Queen’s Necklace, is nearly two miles long, linking the tony South Mumbai to the northern suburbs. Its seafront position sees myriad Mumbai residents out for walks and fresh coconut vendors selling their goods.
    Marine Drive, also known as the Queen’s Necklace, is nearly two miles long, linking the tony South Mumbai to the northern suburbs. Its seafront position sees myriad Mumbai residents out for walks and fresh coconut vendors selling their goods.
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  Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, Mumbai’s iconic railway station, is a UNESCO World Heritage site and one of the foremost examples of Indo-Saracenic architecture.
    Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, Mumbai’s iconic railway station, is a UNESCO World Heritage site and one of the foremost examples of Indo-Saracenic architecture.
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  The jaw-dropping enormity of Mumbai’s slums—–home to nearly 55 percent of the city’s population—–starkly juxtaposes with the emergence of new wealth and booming construction.
    The jaw-dropping enormity of Mumbai’s slums—–home to nearly 55 percent of the city’s population—–starkly juxtaposes with the emergence of new wealth and booming construction.
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  The Kanchanjunga  Apartments, designed by Charles Correa in 1974, is Mumbai’s most visible modernist residential building.
    The Kanchanjunga Apartments, designed by Charles Correa in 1974, is Mumbai’s most visible modernist residential building.
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  Tote on the Turf  is a newly renovated eatery designed by Chris Lee and Kapil Gupta of London-Mumbai firm Serie Architects.
    Tote on the Turf is a newly renovated eatery designed by Chris Lee and Kapil Gupta of London-Mumbai firm Serie Architects.
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  Bijoy Jain of Studio Mumbai designed the interior of Bungalow 8.
    Bijoy Jain of Studio Mumbai designed the interior of Bungalow 8.
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  A street vendor offers colorful lower-budget fare.
    A street vendor offers colorful lower-budget fare.
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