June 26, 2014
Originally published in Modern Across America
In our Modern Across America issue, we spotlighted five American cities with design scenes worth watching. With a slew of significant buildings by architects like Mies van der Rohe and I.M. Pei already under its belt, Baltimore continues to build upon its history of excellence in architecture and design. Here are some of our favorite Baltimore projects from the Dwell archives.
The courtyard captures nature within the embrace of the house, a "room" of green that is simultaneously indoors and outdoors.

A new owner with a light touch has kept the spirit of Marcel Breuer's 1959 Hooper House II intact; a marvel of the mid-20th century, its life will extend well into the 21st. Photo by Zubin Shroff.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Marcel Breuer Hooper House II
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Three stark planes make the dining room a place of sun and shadow: a wall of rock, a floor of bluestone, and a sheer slice of glass. Further adding to the unity of the house, the tubular steel dining chairs were also designed by Breuer.

Furniture designed by Breuer, such as these tubular steel dining chairs, adds a feeling of consistency to the house. Photo by Zubin Shroff.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Marcel Breuer Hooper House II
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Stubb and her family moved to their home, located on 2.25 acres just north of Baltimore, in 2001. "The outdoors here are a big playground," she says. "We had always wanted to build something for the girls that looked natural." In the summer of 2008, they

Comprised of two eight-foot-by-eight-foot platforms that create two floors, and screened in with bamboo shoots, a modern tree house outside Baltimore provides sanctuary for kids and adults alike. Photo courtesy Laurie Stubb.

Originally appeared in Baltimore Tree House
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Prefab home by Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake

Architect Edward Paul Haladay, a volunteer for Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake, helped create a path to affordable prefabs with a row home design for inner-city Baltimore that takes into account the everyday lives of the Habitat families.

Originally appeared in Prefab for Humanity
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Interior of a Baltimore home owned by graphic design couple with wood floors and sliding door

Ellen Lupton and J. Abbott Miller—the husband-wife team that co-founded the multidisciplinary studio Design/Writing/Research—now reside in Baltimore, Maryland, where Lupton is director of the graduate program in graphic design at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA). Photo by Julian Broad.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in J. Abbott Miller and Ellen Lupton
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Glass windows by Paul Warhol, part of public arts program at Johns Hopkins Hospital

The Johns Hopkins Hospital’s new building, the Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children's Center, brought an empathetic and curatorial eye to civic architecture by inviting 70 artists to create more than 500 on-site installations. "The intent (and hope) of the art and architecture program was to uplift the spirit of the patient and the visitor as they arrive here at the hospital, to relieve that initial stress."

Courtesy of 
Paul Warchol 2012
Originally appeared in Public Art at Johns Hopkins
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The courtyard captures nature within the embrace of the house, a "room" of green that is simultaneously indoors and outdoors.

A new owner with a light touch has kept the spirit of Marcel Breuer's 1959 Hooper House II intact; a marvel of the mid-20th century, its life will extend well into the 21st. Photo by Zubin Shroff.

Photo by Zubin Shroff.

Population 621,300

Breakout Firm Ziger/Snead recently renovated a 100-year-old factory that now houses the Baltimore Design School, a public middle and high school that focuses on fashion, architecture, and graphic design curriculums.

Modern Structure Worth a Visit Built by HOK Sport (now Populous) in the early 1990s, Camden Yards ushered in a new era of baseball stadium design that favored traditional-looking parks with modern amenities located in an urban setting.

Hometown Hero Graham Coreil-Allen has created a number of crosswalks in downtown Baltimore as a way to highlight the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District.

 

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