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Illustration Play 2

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Berkeley–based publisher Gingko Press's latest offering is a whimsical celebration of illustrations that literally jump off the page using traditional crafts like quilling and papercutting. In Illustration Play 2: An Expedition to the Extraordinary (the sequel to Illustration Play: Craving for the Extraordinary), 24 artists are introduced with a first-person bio and a small blurb, which are followed by images of their work, including those that show the processes behind them.

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  Minnesota-based artist Gregory Euclide's work explores the way in which he "experiences nature and how it is tied to the cultural practice of constructing landscapes as idealized images." Here, he created a modeled landscape where an overturned paint can and its contents create a river running through the scene.
    Minnesota-based artist Gregory Euclide's work explores the way in which he "experiences nature and how it is tied to the cultural practice of constructing landscapes as idealized images." Here, he created a modeled landscape where an overturned paint can and its contents create a river running through the scene.
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  Russian-born, UK-based artist Yulia Brodskaya's work is, in my opinion, the most fantastic and captivating featured in the book. Formerly an illustrator of the hand-drawn variety, Brodskaya took up quilling, a craft in which thin strips of paper are twirled around a tool to create spiraled shaped that are then glued to paper to great images. Her clients now include publications such New Scientist, the New York Times Magazine, and the Guardian as well as companies such as Hermes, Starbucks, and Target. Here, the steps in creating a illustration for Cadbury.
    Russian-born, UK-based artist Yulia Brodskaya's work is, in my opinion, the most fantastic and captivating featured in the book. Formerly an illustrator of the hand-drawn variety, Brodskaya took up quilling, a craft in which thin strips of paper are twirled around a tool to create spiraled shaped that are then glued to paper to great images. Her clients now include publications such New Scientist, the New York Times Magazine, and the Guardian as well as companies such as Hermes, Starbucks, and Target. Here, the steps in creating a illustration for Cadbury.
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  Australian artist Emma van Leest creates dioramas with paper. "I turned to paper art because the medium is flexible and ephemeral," she says. The inspirations for her images: fairy tales, Asian art, and religious relics.
    Australian artist Emma van Leest creates dioramas with paper. "I turned to paper art because the medium is flexible and ephemeral," she says. The inspirations for her images: fairy tales, Asian art, and religious relics.
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  Another paper sculptor featured in Illustration Play 2 is Los Angeles native Jeff Nishinaka, who creates three-dimensional scenes by cutting and arranging white paper and taking advantage of the shadows the pieces create. Interestingly enough, Jackie Chan owns the largest collection of Nishinaka's creations, though for his commercial work, he boasts a client list including Bloomingdale's, Paramount Pictures, and Coca Cola. Here, works created for O.A.R. and Atlantic records (left), the University of Colorado Hospital (top middle), the U.S. Postal Service (top right), and Avex (bottom right).
    Another paper sculptor featured in Illustration Play 2 is Los Angeles native Jeff Nishinaka, who creates three-dimensional scenes by cutting and arranging white paper and taking advantage of the shadows the pieces create. Interestingly enough, Jackie Chan owns the largest collection of Nishinaka's creations, though for his commercial work, he boasts a client list including Bloomingdale's, Paramount Pictures, and Coca Cola. Here, works created for O.A.R. and Atlantic records (left), the University of Colorado Hospital (top middle), the U.S. Postal Service (top right), and Avex (bottom right).
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  Artist Jennifer Khoshbin uses "books as a sculptural material." Using bound pages as the frame and medium of her work, the American artist creates images that literally jump out of the pages.
    Artist Jennifer Khoshbin uses "books as a sculptural material." Using bound pages as the frame and medium of her work, the American artist creates images that literally jump out of the pages.
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  Unlike the fragile pieces by many other featured artists, German designer Nina Braun, uses soft materials like felt and fabric to create her works, which she refers to as "textile pictures." Here, her Circle of Friends and Big in Japan pieces.
    Unlike the fragile pieces by many other featured artists, German designer Nina Braun, uses soft materials like felt and fabric to create her works, which she refers to as "textile pictures." Here, her Circle of Friends and Big in Japan pieces.
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  At the end of Illustration Play 2, and as many art publications by Viction:ary come to a close, there are several pages of interviews with the artists. The oft-handwritten answers range from how they describe themselves to what's in their toolboxes. The image at the bottom? The first image that pops to their mind when they close their eyes.
    At the end of Illustration Play 2, and as many art publications by Viction:ary come to a close, there are several pages of interviews with the artists. The oft-handwritten answers range from how they describe themselves to what's in their toolboxes. The image at the bottom? The first image that pops to their mind when they close their eyes.
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  Illustration Play 2 goes on sale September 6. For more information, visit victionary.com or gingkopress.com.
    Illustration Play 2 goes on sale September 6. For more information, visit victionary.com or gingkopress.com.

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