The History of the Modern Workspace

written by:
April 20, 2014
Power dynamics, economic upheaval, and design thinking: cubicles aren’t just a Dilbert punch line. Read Full Article
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  Action Office II by Robert Propst for Herman Miller
This revolutionary design advanced a utopian idea that you could somehow have the ability to shape your space. It was called the “workstation” for the “human performer.” Photo by Herman Miller.
    Action Office II by Robert Propst for Herman Miller

    This revolutionary design advanced a utopian idea that you could somehow have the ability to shape your space. It was called the “workstation” for the “human performer.” Photo by Herman Miller.

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  Roll-Top Desk by George Nelson for Herman Miller
This colorful part of the Action Office II system was one of many aspects that was built to adapt to changes in the workplace.
    Roll-Top Desk by George Nelson for Herman Miller

    This colorful part of the Action Office II system was one of many aspects that was built to adapt to changes in the workplace.

  • 
  Interior of Connecticut General Office
The design of this office was one of Florence Knoll’s greatest achievements, according to Cubed author Nikil Saval. “It was the peak of a totally organized, thought-through corporate space. It made an insurance company, a paperwork factory, look good, and kept people there.”
    Interior of Connecticut General Office

    The design of this office was one of Florence Knoll’s greatest achievements, according to Cubed author Nikil Saval. “It was the peak of a totally organized, thought-through corporate space. It made an insurance company, a paperwork factory, look good, and kept people there.”

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  Central Beheer Office
Saval says this design by Herman Hertzberger was one of the great open office plans of Europe, which differed markedly from American interior designs. “It’s like a casbah, a lot of nested, private spaces.”
    Central Beheer Office

    Saval says this design by Herman Hertzberger was one of the great open office plans of Europe, which differed markedly from American interior designs. “It’s like a casbah, a lot of nested, private spaces.”

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  Herman Miller Aeron Chair
Saval says this chair was originally created for residents of nursing homes who spent too much of the day sitting down. “Bill Stumpf, a great designer at Herman Miller, came up with a chair that was way too futuristic for a nursing home, but it ended up being incredibly functional for dot-com workers, who would also be sitting for really long hours.”
    Herman Miller Aeron Chair

    Saval says this chair was originally created for residents of nursing homes who spent too much of the day sitting down. “Bill Stumpf, a great designer at Herman Miller, came up with a chair that was way too futuristic for a nursing home, but it ended up being incredibly functional for dot-com workers, who would also be sitting for really long hours.”

@current / @total

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