Beneath the Streets: Photos of New York’s Secret Underground

written by:
May 21, 2014
A new book opens the door to a subterranean New York only seen by transit workers and graffiti artist. Read Full Article
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  Beneath the Streets
A train passes through an abandoned station in the New York City subway. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    Beneath the Streets

    A train passes through an abandoned station in the New York City subway. Photo courtesy Jurne.

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  Graffiti artist standing on a wood covering over the third rail. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    Graffiti artist standing on a wood covering over the third rail. Photo courtesy Jurne.
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  Masstransiscope—a 228-panel installation by artist Bill Brand—can be viewed from trains headed towards the Manhattan Bridge. It was installed in 1980 and sanctioned by the MTA. Photo courtesy Jurne
    Masstransiscope—a 228-panel installation by artist Bill Brand—can be viewed from trains headed towards the Manhattan Bridge. It was installed in 1980 and sanctioned by the MTA. Photo courtesy Jurne
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  An autobiographical diary entry by the graffiti artist REVS, who scattered these pages of his life story throughout the transit system. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    An autobiographical diary entry by the graffiti artist REVS, who scattered these pages of his life story throughout the transit system. Photo courtesy Jurne.
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  Bright train headlights make their way through the pillars that separate sets of tracks. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    Bright train headlights make their way through the pillars that separate sets of tracks. Photo courtesy Jurne.
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  Emergency exits in tunnels lead back to the street level above. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    Emergency exits in tunnels lead back to the street level above. Photo courtesy Jurne.
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  A section of tunnel in the NYC subway. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    A section of tunnel in the NYC subway. Photo courtesy Jurne.
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  Red and white panels on track walls indicate areas of no clearance in which an individual will be hit by the train. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    Red and white panels on track walls indicate areas of no clearance in which an individual will be hit by the train. Photo courtesy Jurne.
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  ignage on walls let workers know how far they are from the platform. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    ignage on walls let workers know how far they are from the platform. Photo courtesy Jurne.
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  Worker tools left for construction. Photo courtesy Jurne.
    Worker tools left for construction. Photo courtesy Jurne.

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