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An Architect's Pop-Up Book

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One of the perks of being a Dwell editor are the various fun surprises that appear in the mail—newly published books, the occasional small product, even the random staple gun (yes, really). One of the more intriguing things to cross my desk recently was Wendy Evans Joseph's unusual monograph, a chunky hardcover book entitled 'Pop Up Architecture.' Yes: a pop-up book illustrating the firms' recent work, from the Holocaust Memorial Garden in Salt lake City to a cantilevered pedestrian bridge in New York City. Here's a peek inside.

 

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  "When I first considered how to gather and present the firm's work, the conventional monograph-making process struck me as suspect, strangely anachronistic—especially in light of the Web as a more accessible, flexible, and ecological format," writes Joseph in the book's forward. "They say that pictures don't lie, but for architecture they are certainly limited in the truths they can tell. I realized then that the book had to be an artwork in itself, so that it would never be taken for a straight representation of how you experience the built work."
    "When I first considered how to gather and present the firm's work, the conventional monograph-making process struck me as suspect, strangely anachronistic—especially in light of the Web as a more accessible, flexible, and ecological format," writes Joseph in the book's forward. "They say that pictures don't lie, but for architecture they are certainly limited in the truths they can tell. I realized then that the book had to be an artwork in itself, so that it would never be taken for a straight representation of how you experience the built work."
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  Here's the full cover, front to back.
    Here's the full cover, front to back.
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  On the inside front cover, a series of mini pop-ups represent four discrete projects, from a hotel in Greenport to this folded zinc tractor shed in upstate New York with a "false perspective."
    On the inside front cover, a series of mini pop-ups represent four discrete projects, from a hotel in Greenport to this folded zinc tractor shed in upstate New York with a "false perspective."
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  The two pages dedicated to the cantilevered pedestrian bridge at New York's Rockefeller University were my favorite: the towers really 'pop' as soon as you open the book, and the cables (made of elastic string) stretch taut in bridge-like simulation.
    The two pages dedicated to the cantilevered pedestrian bridge at New York's Rockefeller University were my favorite: the towers really 'pop' as soon as you open the book, and the cables (made of elastic string) stretch taut in bridge-like simulation.
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  Here's the boxy Writer's Studio in Ghent, New York, with open glass corners that offer an unimpeded view of the surrounding forest. Up in the right-hand corner of the page is a camouflaged mini-book, with photos illustrating the interior space.
    Here's the boxy Writer's Studio in Ghent, New York, with open glass corners that offer an unimpeded view of the surrounding forest. Up in the right-hand corner of the page is a camouflaged mini-book, with photos illustrating the interior space.
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  For the page dedicated to the Wykagyl Shopping Center, metallic paper strips represent the bent aluminum cornice mounted above the retail spaces.
    For the page dedicated to the Wykagyl Shopping Center, metallic paper strips represent the bent aluminum cornice mounted above the retail spaces.
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  One of the more dynamic pop-up projects is the Holocaust Memorial Garden: Pull on the arrowed tabs, and the courtyard comes to 3-D life.
    One of the more dynamic pop-up projects is the Holocaust Memorial Garden: Pull on the arrowed tabs, and the courtyard comes to 3-D life.
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  Joseph describes the Home Observatory as a mixture of craft and mischief. "Traditionally, observatories are solid, stoic, and windowless—buildings meant neither for looking out of nor looking at. Here we abandoned precedent, conceiving of the entire structure as a garden pavilion with the viewing room elevated a full story above the ground level. Abstract and modern in character, the structure has wood slats that play with shifting daylight." Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    Joseph describes the Home Observatory as a mixture of craft and mischief. "Traditionally, observatories are solid, stoic, and windowless—buildings meant neither for looking out of nor looking at. Here we abandoned precedent, conceiving of the entire structure as a garden pavilion with the viewing room elevated a full story above the ground level. Abstract and modern in character, the structure has wood slats that play with shifting daylight."

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

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